Access to Higher Education Makes the American Dream a Reality

This week we celebrate the most American holiday: the 4th of July. A personal part of the celebration of independence is the concept of the American dream: that people have the right to pursue their goals and with hard work, and through upward mobility, achieve their individual version of success. For many, access to higher education is a key to achieving their American dream. Ted Yoho, Florida Congressman, says the American dream comes from opportunity.

For many people opportunity for many people is closely tied to access to higher education. And that access is the key to upward mobility for many citizens, including low income and minority individuals. Access to higher education is an effective way to ensure that large populations of US citizens have opportunities to pursue their personal dream and achieve upward mobility. Higher education empowers people to benefit from and contribute to the economy.

Success rates and mobility rates are key to helping students that have been historically unrepresented achieve success. By 2050 almost half of the US population will be minority groups, according to US Census data. Empowering minority groups and all segments of the population to achieve success through higher education is part of the American dream for individuals and important for the general economy.

David Gardner, The Chief Academic Officer to Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board says, “Most students go to college to get a better job, and that’s not an unreasonable expectation. We know we’re going to be a diverse society… but will we have a diverse workforce? Are we empowering everyone to really benefit from the economy?”

Higher education institutions mobility rates and success rates illustrate how students achieve upward mobility through education – as long as they have access.

Family income often influences access to higher education. At Ivy League colleges more students come from the top 1 percent of income level than from the bottom 50 percent. However, students from both low income and high income brackets achieve success at these highly selective schools.

Data from the Equality of Opportunity Project shows that at selective colleges student from low-income families have about the same chance of reaching the top fifth of the income distribution as students from higher income families.  For example, about 60 percent of Columbia University students, both from low and high income families, reach the top fifth of income brackets.  “In this sense, colleges successfully “level the playing field” across enrolled students with different socioeconomic backgrounds,” states the project report.

Many other schools contribute to achieving the American dream for many students. In fact, the colleges that have the highest upward mobility rates are generally mid-tier public schools that have many low-income students and very good outcomes. The high 60 percent success rate at selective schools moves relatively few students from the bottom to the top income bracket, because fewer low-income students attend.  Mid-tier schools with larger low-income and minority student populations move many more students to high income brackets, creating a high mobility rate.  A higher mobility rate means that greater numbers of people will be able to fully participate in economy which is good for the country as a whole. The higher mobility rates also mean that more individuals will be able to achieve success and fulfill their version of the American dream.

One obstacle to the American dream is access to education and the Equality of Opportunity shows that access to the mid-tier public schools with the highest mobility rates has fallen in recent years. This may be because of reduction in state support and tuition increases at these schools. The makes a strong case for the advantages that tuition assistance programs can give students. Tuition assistance helps carve the path for upward mobility as students complete their education and gain skills they need for better jobs. Tuition assistance give students of all income levels and every population group an advantage that can help them achieve success.

 

This week we celebrate the most American holiday: the 4th of July. A personal part of the celebration of independence is the concept of the American dream: that people have the right to pursue their goals and with hard work and through upward mobility achieve their individual version of success. Ted Yoho, Florida Congressman, says the American dream comes from opportunity.

For many people opportunity for many people is closely tied to access to higher education. And that access is the key to upward mobility for many citizens, including low income and minority individuals. Access to higher education is an effective way to ensure that large populations of US citizens have opportunities to pursue their personal dream and achieve upward mobility. Higher education empowers g people to benefit from and contribute to the economy.

Success rates and mobility rates are key to helping students that have been historically unrepresented achieve success. By 2050 almost half of the US population will be minority groups, according to US Census data. Empowering minority groups and all segments of the population to achieve success through higher education is part of the American dream for individuals and important for the general economy.

David Gardner, The Chief Academic Officer to Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board says, “Most students go to college to get a better job, and that’s not an unreasonable expectation. We know we’re going to be a diverse society… but will we have a diverse workforce? Are we empowering everyone to really benefit from the economy?” https://www.collegeboard.org/membership/all-access/counseling-admissions-financial-aid-academic/higher-education-and-american

 

Higher education institutions success rates mobility rates and success rates illustrate how students achieve upward mobility through education – as long as they have access.

Family income often influences access to higher education. At Ivy League colleges more students come from the top 1 percent of income level than from the bottom 50 percent. However, students from both low income and high income brackets achieve success at these highly selective schools.

Data from the Equality of Opportunity Project shows that at selective colleges student from low-income families have about the same chance of reaching the top fifth of the income distribution as students from higher income families.  For example, about 60 percent of Columbia University students, both from low and high income families, reach the top fifth of income brackets.  “In this sense, colleges successfully “level the playing field” across enrolled students with different socioeconomic backgrounds,” states the project report.

http://www.equality-of-opportunity.org/assets/documents/coll_mrc_summary.pdf

Many other schools contribute to achieving the American dream for many students. In fact, the colleges that have the highest upward mobility rates are generally mid-tier public schools that have many low-income students and very good outcomes. The high 60 percent success rate at selective schools moves relatively few students from the bottom to the top income bracket, because fewer low-income students attend.  Mid-tier schools with larger low-income and minority student populations move many more students to high income brackets, creating a high mobility rate. http://www.equality-of-opportunity.org/college/ A higher mobility rate means that greater numbers of people will be able to fully participate in economy which is good for the country as a whole. The higher mobility rates also mean that more individuals will be able to achieve success and fulfill their version of the American dream.

One obstacle to the American dream is access to education and the Equality of Opportunity shows that access to the mid-tier public schools with the highest mobility rates has fallen in recent years. This may be because of reduction in state support and tuition increases at these schools. The makes a strong case for the advantages that tuition assistance programs can give students. Tuition assistance helps carve the path for upward mobility as students complete their education and gain skills they need for better jobs. Tuition assistance give students of all income levels and every population group an advantage that can help them achieve success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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